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Unconquered

$399.00

This photograph is of a statue by Fritz White that stands in front of Doak Campbell Stadium (FSU) in Tallahassee, Florida and depicts Chief Osceola atop his horse “Renegade.” This is a high dynamic range black and white photograph which gives you a greater depth of field than a normal photograph.

This photograph is of a statue by Fritz White that stands in front of Doak Campbell Stadium (FSU) in Tallahassee, Florida and depicts Chief Osceola atop his horse “Renegade.” This is a high dynamic range black and white photograph which gives you a greater depth of field than a normal photograph.

Osceola was born in a Creek Indian town in 1804 that you know today as Tallassee, Alabama. Creek and Muscogee (Osceola’s Mother was Muscogee) Indians were forcibly removed to the Oklahoma Indian Territory by the Federal Government during a period of time in the 1830’s known as the “Trail of Tears.” However, many escaped to Florida, joined and intermarried with local Florida tribes, to form the Seminole tribe. The Seminole Tribe of Florida are known as the “Unconquered” because they fought three wars with U.S. Troops between 1817 and 1858, were never defeated in battle, — and never surrendered. The U.S. Government spent 20 million dollars fighting the Seminoles, lost more than 1,500 soldiers and scores of uncounted American civilians.

In 1837 Chief Osceola was lured to St. Augustine under what became a false flag of truce and captured. He was betrayed during the peace negotiations by General Joseph Hernandez on the orders of General Thomas Jesup and held captive until 1838, dying in prison. Osceola’s capture by deceit caused a national uproar and has been described in history books as “one of the most disgraceful acts in American military history.”

The Chief Osceola legend began to grow when in 1832 Osceola was one of a handful of Seminole Chiefs who refused to sign a peace treaty with the United States exchanging their Florida lands for lands West of the Mississippi. It was during this meeting that Chief Osceola is said to have pushed his way to the front while drawing his knife, and planted it through the peace treaty and into the table. He refused to agree to the terms of the peace treaty and he refused to leave Florida.

Photograph is 24″ wide x 16″ high with a black wood frame and a 2″ white window mat. Non-Glare glass was used in the framing. Each print is digitally signed.

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